Bob LaMonte, Our 2011 Cleveland Browns MVP

by Cleveland Frowns on January 10, 2012

In the wake of a 4-12 season in which the Cleveland Browns regressed in every way under the leadership of a rookie head coach “who will be here a very long time” whether anybody likes it or not, Browns fan’s hopes are pinned more than ever to intangible notions of “philosophical unity” and the competence of the men upstairs. So our MVP for 2011 has to go to the man pulling all the strings (and cashing in on all the paychecks) in Berea, Bob LaMonte, the NFL superagent who represents Browns President Mike Holmgren, Browns GM Tom Heckert, Browns Executive Vice President Bryan Wiedmeier, Browns head coach Pat Shurmur, and Browns quarterbacks coach Mark Whipple.

When Randy Lerner overreacted to the self-interested publicity stunt of an illiterate but incredibly successful media whore/”superfan” by throwing $50 million and the keys to the kingdom at Mike Holmgren at the end of 2009, Mike Lombardi could hardly have been more prescient in noting that “no one will gain or maintain employment with the Browns unless they come with the blessing and representation of LaMonte.” The Browns might as well be called “the Cleveland LaMontes” now, Lombardi said.

So what is it that entitles LaMonte to such influence?

For one, there are unimaginable piles of cash flying around in professional sports, and more by the day, especially in American football, where, according to Lombardi, LaMonte is especially skilled at “creating illusions” on behalf of his clients; Like Charlie Weis, for whom LaMonte negotiated what Lombardi calls “the single worst deal in the history of contracts” when Weis was hired as head football coach at Notre Dame.

But more importantly, LaMonte is close personal friends with Mike Holmgren, with whom he came up in the football business just as these unimaginable piles of cash started flying around. In the 70s, Holmgren and LaMonte were members of the same coaching staff at San Jose’s Oak Grove high school, where LaMonte was a history teacher. From there, LaMonte was able to leverage two Oak Grove connections, Toronto Blue Jays pitching great Dave Stieb and former Packers quarterback Scott Campbell (the sixth overall pick in the 1981 NFL draft), along with his relationship with Holmgren (LaMonte’s first client), to build the career that he has today, where his client list includes the following in addition to the Browns junta discussed above:

Dominik, Mark – General Manager, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
*Polian, Chris – Former General Manager and Vice President, Indianapolis Colts
Roseman, Howie – General Manager, Philadelphia Eagles
Smith, Rick – General Manager, Houston Texans
Spielman, Rick – General Manager, Minnesota Vikings
Dawson, Lake – Vice President of Football Operations, Tennessee Titans
Keim, Steve – Director of Player Personnel, Arizona Cardinals
*Mueller, Randy – Senior Executive, San Diego Chargers
Telesco, Tom – Director of Player Personnel, Indianapolis Colts
*Childress, Brad – Former Head Coach, Minnesota Vikings
DeRuyter, Tim – Head Coach, Fresno State Bulldogs
Fox, John – Head Coach, Denver Broncos
*Frazier, Leslie – Head Coach, Minnesota Vikings
Reid, Andy – Head Coach, Philadelphia Eagles
*Sherman, Mike – Former Head Coach, Texas A&M Aggies
*Spagnuolo, Steve – Former Head Coach, St. Louis Rams
*Weis, Charlie – Head Coach, Kansas Jayhawks
Christensen, Clyde – Offensive Coordinator, Indianapolis Colts
Cunningham, Gunther – DC/Assistant Head Coach, Detroit Lions
Gray, Jerry – Defensive Coordinator, Tennessee Titans
*Gruden, Jay – Offensive Coordinator, Cincinnati Bengals
*Martz, Mike – Former Offensive Coordinator, Chicago Bears
McCoy, Mike – Offensive Coordinator, Denver Broncos
McDermott, Sean – Defensive Coordinator, Carolina Panthers
Mornhinweg, Marty – Offensive Coordinator, Philadelphia Eagles
*Nolan, Mike – Defensive Coordinator, Miami Dolphins
Saunders, Al – Offensive Coordinator, Oakland Raiders
*Schottenheimer, Brian – Offensive Coordinator, New York Jets
Houck, Hudson – Offensive Line Coach, Dallas Cowboys
McAdoo, Ben – Tight Ends Coach, Green Bay Packers
McNulty, John – Wide Receivers Coach, Arizona Cardinals
Morris, Pat – Former Offensive Line Coach, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Roberts, Daron – Wide Receivers Coach, West Virginia Mountaineers
*Singletary, Mike – Assistant Head Coach, LB Coach, Minnesota Vikings

What Lombardi says about “illusions” should resonate *especially well after a look at this list, and reports that LaMonte client Mark Dominik is about to hire LaMonte client Mike Sherman as the head coach in Tampa Bay after the meltdown that took place on Sherman’s watch at Texas A&M this season are especially impressive. But there’s no more American story of relentless aggregation and consolidation of power than the LaMontization of the Cleveland Browns.

While LaMonte wields considerable influence with other NFL organizations, including the Colts (acting GM and offensive coordinator), Vikings (GM, head coach, assistant head coach) and Eagles (GM, head coach, OC) there is no organization as dominated by LaMonte clients as the Browns. And of course, none of these other organizations has an owner as uninterested and passive as Randy Lerner is with respect to his NFL franchise.

When the Plain Dealer’s Bill Lubinger wrote a piece about LaMonte sitting at every side of the negotiating table when the Browns were hammering out a deal last winter with Pat Shurmur — a man who was on literally nobody else’s list as an NFL head coaching candidate — the PD scribe pointed out that “a lawyer can’t represent both sides in a divorce,” and he ended with a quote from a Vermont Law Professor Michael McCann: “The fix is easy, at least in theory … Get a new agent.”

Not surprisingly, Lerner, LaMonte, and Browns general counsel Fred Nance each declined to talk to Lubinger about “how an agent can represent both sides of the coach’s hiring.” The reporter explained that “the NFL treats such situations more like a real estate deal than a divorce,” and “in Ohio and many states, a real estate agent can work on behalf of the buyer and seller if both agree to the arrangement.”

Which is perfect, really, especially for Cleveland. As much as you might want to believe that your beloved NFL franchise is a public trust and that every town is entitled to accountable management of a professional football team that’s at least competent every once in awhile, Cleveland should know better than anyone that this just isn’t the case. Of course what we’re talking about here is just private chattel from which the Lerners and LaMontes of the world draw their annuities as they see fit, with winning football purely incidental if it happens at all. “There’s always a powerbroker lurking in the halls of the Browns’ complex,” LaMonte’s “basement wine cellar is sufficiently stocked,” and the rest of us should be plenty used to this by now.

Still, much easier to understand thanks to the work of Bob LaMonte, our 2011 Cleveland Browns MVP.

—————

*ESPN’s Chris Mortensen reported last week that LaMonte client Brad Childress is among the candidates to become the new Browns offensive coordinator, but others believe that Childress is unlikely to land here because he’s going to be paid another $9 million over the next two years by the Vikings, who fired him during the 2010 season just after giving him a lucrative three-year extension at the end of ’09 when there were no other conceivable bidders for his services.

**Thanks to @SeaninColumbus for helping to put this post together.

RELATED:

The tapes that Bob Lamonte and Mike Holmgren (and Vic Carucci) don’t want you to see” (NFL, ‘Powerbrokers’ and Video);

On Peter King’s Insane Assessment of Colt McCoy” (NFL, ‘Powerbrokers’ and Print Media).

  • https://twitter.com/jimkanicki jimkanicki

    “…private chattel from which the Lerners and LaMontes of the world draw their annuities as they see fit, with winning football purely incidental if it happens at all.”

    perfect.

    • Anonymous

      Sounds like the ethos of the County Judiciary.

  • http://twitter.com/byRiverBurns River Burns

    Score one for the Indians in the common sense department when it comes to having a conflict of interest at the negotiating table. When it came to the the Indians dealing with a Ron Shaprio (Mark’s father/SuperAgent) client, both the elder Sharpiro and his son, then-GM of The Indians, abstained from the meetings.

    The LaMonte versus LaMonte approach was irresponsible and reprehensible at an absolute minimum. Do I blame LaMonte for this mess? Of course not, I blame Randy Lerner and Mike Holmgren.

    Wait, strike that last part; I’m not sure where I’m getting my playoff tickets if I burn that bridge…

    • kjn

      That’s a constant refrain of mine: the Indians deserve so much more credit from the fans.

      They’re a poor-but-classy organization that competes more regularly than they should, all things considered.

      Yet because the Dolans rely on attendance from a fickle fanbase to support their team, they find themselves exploiting every revenue stream they can just to be able to afford a payroll that’s in the bottom third of the league. Despite these limitations, they have been FAR more successful on the field than the Browns. For this, they get called cheap and accused of exploiting the fans.

      Meanwhile, the Browns, who live off a billion dollar NFL-TV contract, PSLs, and consistent sellouts, spent well under the NFL salary cap this year despite huge holes throughout the roster.

      And don’t even get me started on Shapiro’s front office compared to Holmgren’s team.

      /rant off

      • Anonymous

        Winner. They are the best organization in Cleveland and it is not even close…they also have a shot this year if they stay healthy.

        I often think about how different things would be had Lerner actually pulled the trigger and given Shapiro the job.

        • Anonymous

          I have a bad feeling the Pomerantz deal was a foolish departure from the model that will doom us to missing our 2 year window this decade.

          • Anonymous

            assuming he’s not a serial DUI offender..

          • Anonymous

            Hey I never saw that. Maybe he’ll turn out to be a punk.

          • Anonymous

            Was not thrilled with that move but if Ubaldo finds it this year you have a 1-2 punch that could carry you if you find a way into the playoffs. Thinking about the upcoming Tribe season is the only thing that keeps me sane about the Browns.

          • Anonymous

            >>> Thinking about the upcoming Tribe season is the only thing that keeps me sane about the Browns. >>>

            !

            !!!!

          • kjn

            Jimenez isn’t the Cy Young caliber pitcher some made him out to be, but he’s a quality starter. If you look at his peripheral numbers, he has generally been the same type of guy throughout his time in the majors.

            I just don’t get the love for White or Pomz, two unproven commodities. Not to say they’re not good. Pitching prospects just don’t usually pan out. Name a drafted Cleveland pitcher draft from the last decade or so not named CC that you wouldn’t have traded for a quality, MLB-proven starter.

            File under calculated risk.

          • Anonymous

            Exactly. Ubaldo has one of the best contracts in baseball.

          • Anonymous

            IF he gets healthy and IF he can pitch like he did one year, THEN he has one of the best contracts in baseball.

            I think you’ll find Pomerantz has a significantly better contract, and will for several more years.

            Departure from the model. On the cheap.

          • kjn

            Best contract in baseball is Bud Selig’s. Guy just got two more years.

          • Believelander

            We’re talking value here. That’s the worst contract in baseball.

          • Anonymous

            >>>I just don’t get the love for White or Pomz, two unproven commodities.>>>

            White was a good “prospect.” Pomerantz was an utter phenomenon. I think he was probably the #1 prospect in baseball at the time he was traded.

            Most of the people who aren’t upset about this didn’t see the kid pitch. I was cursed with MiLB.TV, and I think I know what we lost. He could get hurt (although his motion is very nice). Other than that, I’ll honestly be fairly shocked if he’s not a legit ace by next year. I’ll be similarly shocked if Ubaldo stays healthy and posts an era under 4.

            Who knows with pitchers I guess. But that’s the very reason you don’t make that deal if you ask me.

          • kjn

            I have never seen Pomeranz ranked as anything close to the #1 prospect in baseball. Too lazy to do an exhaustive search, but Baseball America had him at #61 going into 2011.

            The issue with young pitching prospects most of the time is whether or not their arms fall off by 24 or so (see Herb Score).

            Dude may be great, but I don’t think the trade was the stretch people made it out to be.

          • Anonymous

            Yeah, but what you can do is look at what those other 61 guys did in 2011 versus what he did, which was blow through 2 levels of baseball with over a strikeout per inning, 3-1 strikeout to walk ratio, and and a 1.78 era.

            I saw an updated prospect list mid 2011 that had him at 11 right after the AA promotion. He’d be top 3 for sure if he hadn’t already jumped to the majors.

            Maybe he’ll bust, but I think Ubaldo is twice as likely to bust as he is.

          • kjn

            Duly noted. Time will tell.

          • Anonymous

            “I think he was probably the #1 prospect in baseball at the time he was traded.”

            puff puff give smokey!

            Pomeranz was ranked #38th overall prospect by BaseballAmerica, and the 8th best pitching prospect.

          • Anonymous

            Was that updated at the time of the trade? The thing is, when they jumped him up during the year he dominated even more than he had at A+. I think the first two starts in the majors were borderline dominant too.

            I’ll say this. I scanned around and actually watched the top minor league starter prospects last year with MiLBTV. I MIGHT have traded him for that guy Detroit brought up, and I’d consider Tehren from Az. I think who throws a ball about like Bartolo both to the good and bad. That’s about it. I think I watched all the top guys.

            Some of the others, like that little Mexican for NY, seemed way overrated and if they were still ahead of Pomz after what he looked like then I guess I stand corrected. Maybe I’ve just got Cliff Lee in my eyes.

        • kjn

          I love how local perception seems to deem each move by the Indians front office a total failure (CC/Lee/Martinez trades; Hafner/Sizemore extensions; Wood/Dellucci signings; Jimenez trade) while applauding the moves by the Browns (Hillis trade; Mack/Thomas picks; Steinbach/Fujita signings; every non-Mangini draft), yet it is the Tribe who boasts the organization that competes on a regular basis and is, generally, flushed with talent.

          • Sandytowne

            I would argue that almost every single Tribe move listed (sans the Victor deal), but especially the CC and Lee deals, is the very definition of failure. The Tribe traded two Cy Young award winners, one under club control for an entire year before being traded, for what amounts to a number three starter who just had tommy john surgery and a bunch of replacement level regulars.

            Hindsight is of course 20/20, but when you trade that caliber of pitching, you need to hit on at least one legitimate piece to the puzzle. Outside of Carassco (who, as mentioned above will not pitch this year), none of those players looks to be a starter on a contending team.

          • kjn

            I’m not trying to defend any of those moves (though I could, to a point… Masterson is ace-ish and Marson/Donald/Brantley are all still young, developing players who will grow and contribute. Carassco’s arm fell off. Hagadone and Knapp are still young. Laporta is Laporta).

            I’m merely pointing out that people constantly criticize the misses of the Indians front office while rarely focusing on the hits.

          • Anonymous

            Hagadone is currently probably the best asset out of that whole lot there.

          • kjn

            One last point: speaking from a strictly statistical point of view, Marson and Donald are above replacement level players.

  • Anonymous

    How much does Shurmur get paid anyhow? i can’t seem to find anything online. i guess Lamonte has Eric Schmidt with Google as a client as well..

    • Anonymous

      Don’t forget he was doing the work of two men (cough).

      • actovegin1armstrong

        CLTIL,
        You are incorrect.
        He was doing the work of three men!
        Larry, Curly and Moe.

    • Brian Sipe

      I think I heard $2.5 million

      • Anonymous

        Which would put him at lowest in NFL. Boy Lamonte really pulled the wool over his own client’s eyes. (Which client got the better deal is yet to be determined)

  • Anonymous

    i guess sharing same agent with the new incoming GM didn’t do Hue Jackson any favors..

    • Anonymous

      Some agents are better than others.

  • kjn

    Looking at that list reminds me how much nepotism/cronyism exists in the pro football coaching ranks. If I was a less lazy man, I might do some research to support the argument that the most successful organizations are the ones that avoid that rubbish.

    • Anonymous

      Me too. We should start a non-profit.

      • actovegin1armstrong

        Great idea Frownie,
        I have been working for a non-profit for the last month, but not intentionally. I just have no skills.

  • Peter

    Most of those guys are ringless bastards….Not a great pool of talent

    • Anonymous

      I’d like to see some actual analysis of their success. Of course this is hard. And you’ll have a tough time convincing me that Lamonte doesn’t currently represent the best coach in the NFL. And no, it isn’t Shurmur.

      • Anonymous

        Whipple?

        • Anonymous

          No, not Mr. Whipple. I’ll give you a haiku hint

          Retarded QB?
          I’m just as sly as myself
          and can fix what ails

          • Anonymous

            +1 Canid

          • actovegin1armstrong

            Bupa,
            Myriad low bows for the masterful haiku!
            You should meet the great Conrad Chouroun.

          • actovegin1armstrong

            But…..
            Please Bupa, please do not Tim Duncan on us.

    • Anonymous

      so agents are responsible for the success of their clients??? sheesh, tough crowd. i guess he’s one heckuva snake charmer to fool a bunch of successful billionaire businessmen.

      There are 32 GMs in the NFL, he represented 6 of them this year.
      32 HCs, he represented 5 this season.
      32 OCs, he represented 8 of them
      32 DCs, he represented 4 of them.

      not bad for a former History teacher from Reno, NV

  • Anonymous

    Great read frowns, VERY well done.

    For better or worse, the organization was turned over to this syndicate. They hire themselves. They draft how they want, coach how they want, develop how they want even divide up the money amongst themselves however they want and handout the (imaginary) future playoff tickets however they want. The more publicity around the fact of this Lamontian 30-tyrants set up the better. But my reason for saying that has a slant to it, and as per usual, it’s a sunny, happy slant.

    The favor the media can do by continually reminding everyone just how consolidated this power is, is to reinforce the stake this crew has in the pot. Not to run them out. Not to correct injustice. To increase the stake. Because that is the bright side of this Lamonte proxy-ownership situation. This overstocking is a big, visible, unified chunk of an entire coaching and management tree, put on trial in Cleveland. It’s a tree that has credibility, and runs on credibility, and its reputation has been quite openly tossed in the pot. That is a good thing, and making it as apparent as possible is a good thing.

    Now maybe these guys don’t really care, maybe their interests don’t extend beyond a quick score. But they probably do, because when you look at how extensive this operation already is, it’s not unreasonable to say they might have as much or more to lose in this whole deal than to gain. That’s the flip-side. And while this might not be exactly the kind of stake we would hope for, nor approach the force embodied in the amalgamated interests of an entire city of fans, as in GB, it may be better than bad, it might be the best we can do, and it may be good enough.

    • c.scales

      amazing take, ingenius, and possibly bcredible!!

      we’ll see!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • Anonymous
        • c.scales

          just curious, do you view this regime as being totally incompetent vis avis the manginiophiles, or can you see a distinct improvement being possible next year??

          • Anonymous

            As the resident optimist here, I’m pleased to inform that

            A. I see things.
            Namely solid progress in talent, and

            B. I think that while Mangini was a clearly and undeniably superior coach to Shurmur, this total model is a clearer path to long-term success. I think we’ll spend money, win 2 division games next year, and be able to at least sniff the playoffs on a moderately distant breeze.

    • Anonymous

      Like except “might be the best we can do.” There is no way it is anything close to that.

      • Anonymous

        >>>There is no way it is anything close to that. >>>

        Randolph Lerner, esq., begs to disagree.

        • Anonymous

          Exactly.

          • Anonymous

            Exactly.

    • actovegin1armstrong

      The Bupa world has pretty blue skies and happy, puffy pink clouds.
      In BupaWorld I am going to win the lottery, even though I never play. (It is a tax for the mathematically ignorant.)
      You know I love you Bupa and I always appreciate your silver, well actually pristine platinum linings to every cloud of dismay.
      I wish I had your sunny outlook and optimistic fervor.
      You are still my hero Bupa, but you may be stepping into the bounds of some frightening and surreal optimistic cult.
      Please do not drink the Kool-Aid.

      • Anonymous
        • actovegin1armstrong

          Bupa you Bastard,
          Well…. not exactly bastard, I mean it with all the love possible. I can not get that link to work, no matter which door I sneak in to view it.

  • Anonymous

    I can’t get over the similarities between LaMonte’s hairstyle and that of the buffalo in that painting. Do you think he just lugs that thing into his barbershop/hairpiece maker and says, “THIS. I want it to look exactly like THIS.”

    • Anonymous

      Captions were great today. Whole thing really. Hope this gets some run.

      • Anonymous

        I passed it along, including to a guy I know who is entry level in the biz, just for his take.

      • Anonymous

        “hope this gets some run” – me too.

    • kjn

      If that was the case, get me the name of that barber cause the dude did a helluva job.

    • actovegin1armstrong

      Frownie,
      You are correct, there is an absolutely uncanny resemblance to that unfortunate bison. Instead of that clown mounting the bison, it would be more humorous if the bison mounted him.
      However he most assuredly is not trying to emulate the poor beast, I think he just asks for the same bad perm he has been getting since it was almost popular for 10 minutes in 1975.

    • Anonymous

      Hey, he still looks younger than Lerner – who is 15 years his junior. That Shatner Chia-Agent special is doing wonders if you ask me.

      • Anonymous

        Aaaaahg. Now I’m connecting the curly hair. Seriously, I take it all back!

    • https://twitter.com/jimkanicki jimkanicki

      guys, it’s worse than a bad haircut.

      it’s a bad rug.

      • Anonymous

        Jesus. I think Kanick’s right. I’m taking back all the hopeful things I said. If that is a rug, that dude is sick.

        • Anonymous

          The wine cellar depleted the hair budget. It happens.

    • Anonymous

      he lives in Nevada, home of the toupee, Reno no less

  • Anonymous

    thanks for this frownie.

    (and for enlightening me wrt dual agency law in ohio once again)

  • Brian Sipe

    My favorite LaMonte reference ever was when Holmgren introduces Shurmur last year and when asked about LaMonte connection Holmgren responded…”I really had no idea Shurmur was represented by Bob until we agreed to hire him, I said wow, you have him too?”

  • Jcohen

    Which Cleveland team has the most pathetic ownership?

    Browns — The Idiot Son
    Cavs — American Psycho
    Indians — Ebeneezer Scrooge

    • Anonymous

      You can call Dolan Scrooge…I’ll call him the only honest one in the bunch who hires good people and lets them do their job in the most unfair of the major sports.

      • Anonymous

        Yeah he isn’t scrooge. He just doesn’t have the money (or else the gambler’s mentality) to run any other model than the discount one. Jacobs softened up the orange and squeezed it, and now it is what it is.

    • actovegin1armstrong

      Jco,
      Where would you place the Cincinnati Bungles in this “lowerarchy”?

    • Anonymous

      Yeah, it’s really not close.

      Dolans — Best Cleveland Owners — when you factor in MLB’s skewed economics you really can’t call them cheap.

      Lerner — An extremely close shave for second worst, mostly because he doesn’t speak in “Gilbertisms.”

      Gilbert — Worst.

      • Anonymous

        Gilbert actually spends time in Cleveland, and will spend money to win championships. Lerner pisses (British version of the word, so it is not offensive) money away to avoid the team at all costs. If you equate it to parenting it’s like the Tiger Mom vs. Gloria James.

      • Anonymous

        No, no, no – Lerner, clearly.

        He’s the worst of the worst – disinterested & absentee.

        I have seen the results of absentee ownership for years in my work. It’s always disastrous. Add disinterest and its a guarantee of failure.

        • Anonymous

          Indisputable. But in their respective sports, both Lerner and Dolan help their teams lose.

      • Anonymous

        Gilbert basically went out and bought an extra #1 pick out of his own pocket that ended up being maybe the key to a rebuild. Guy isn’t terribly likable, but when you put ownership in terms of which owner actually impacts his teams chances of winning, he’s the only ‘plus’ owner in this town. Separating economics from ownership, especially in baseball, is scraping the white off rice.

        If Lerner and Dolan could swap franchises, wins would fall on Cleveland like rain.

        • Anonymous

          “If Lerner and Dolan could swap franchises, wins would fall on Cleveland like rain”

          Agreed – excellent observation.

      • Brian Sipe

        WRONG… Dolan gets money from large market teams in revenue sharing, he gets STO money and he still puts out a $46 mill payroll it is a JOKE!

  • jpftribe

    Great post Frowns, Really well written.

    I did a little, and I mean very little, online research of LaMonte and you can bring up excepts of his book online at google. A little royalty-free research is a beautiful thing. Anyway, in his opening chapter, and I’m paraphrasing here, but he basically states his candidates don’t interview for the job, they already have it when they go in.

    Further, he and his wife sit down at the end of every season and map all of the openings in the NFL with all of his candidates to identify who would be the right fit for each organization.

    The book was written in like 2005, so I’m sure his practice has evolved since then, they prolly use computers for that sort of stuff now.

    It’s good to know that Shurmur already had the job before they did the interview with him. I wonder how the other two, at least I think there were two, candidates felt about that during their interviews. So much for that Rooney rule stuff…

    I also wonder if Fox was penciled into the Denver job, given he’s a LaMonte client as well…..

    Nothing like closing your marketplace to one vendor to ensure you get the best possible selection of all available choices. Maybe we should only draft players from Alabama and LSU, because hey, they are the best in the country right?

  • jpftribe

    ESPN reporting RG III will announce NFL eligibility and agent on Tuesday.

    Wonder who might be representing him?

    • Anonymous

      Lamonte’s niche is mangement and coaches, doesn’t have any NFL players… but he did work his snake charmer on Chris Carpenter and roped the Cardinals into breaking the bank for him. those foolish people who run the Cards, oh wait, they won 2 rings with Carpy

    • actovegin1armstrong

      Stapleton will rep RG3.

  • Davekolonich

    Makes one long for the days of Jim Bailey and Art Modell. Oh wait – never mind.

    • actovegin1armstrong

      Davekol,
      I still have my “Burn in Hell Art Modell” t-shirt. Where were you when this abomination occurred? Would you like to jump on to Cafe Press and get it going again?

      • Davekolonich

        I was wondering why I had bought that Andre Rison jersey. Now I’m wondering why Randy Lerner continues to get a free pass.

  • Anonymous

    FrOrange, can I have a gift certificate to Red Lobster? I’d like a free one so I don’t have to pay.

    O.K.?

  • Anonymous

    You’d think with all of that money he’d get better hair.

  • Anonymous

    FrOrange, can you please tell me about the Red Lobster Gift Certificate? I really want one for free.

  • https://twitter.com/jimkanicki jimkanicki

    titus linked to ‘end of sanchez’ article in nydn.

    i’d take a flier on him. at least call to see what the price was for him. 4th rounder? done. 3rd rounder? enhhhh…

    titus and chris m think i’m high.

    am i high?

    (i’m not linking to hermoine clapping btw.. disqus issues…)

    • http://twitter.com/cpmack Chris

      Are they clapping because Pullo and I think you’re high? Let me know and I’ll click like if they are thanks.

    • Anonymous

      You are most definitely high, or else you’re having a stroke. Take a couple of aspirin.

    • Anonymous

      I’d take him for a 3rd, but maybe not our 3rd, that’s kind of high. They won’t dump him quite like that I don’t think though. He’s incrementally better and much more experienced than Colt, so why not…if we can’t address QB adequately this year, he’d be a decent stop-gap.

  • Anonymous

    KC hires Romeo.

    I find this hilarious & baffling.

    To me he was the worst coach in Brown’s history & the creator (along with Savage) of the dysfunctional zoo that Mangini walked into.

    • Anonymous

      romeo was not a good coach. but i would hire him over shurmur or davis.

      caring too much + ineffective > being a defensive, blame-someone-else asshole + ineffective

    • Anonymous

      I don’t think it’s all that cut and dried, because different coaches can work differently with different groups of players. Romeo was a mess here with Winslow/Braylon/Rogers/etc., but I don’t expect Romeo to fail in KC. I think Pioli will understand his management style and help create a locker room that works with that style. Too much is made of the coach and not enough of the total dynamic between coach and GM. Pioli’s a good GM and I think we’ll find RAC has a 2nd act in him.

      • Anonymous

        Problem is, in today’s NFL, there are Winslow/Braylon/Rogers/etc on every team.

    • Anonymous

      worst coach in Browns history?? He probably had the most guys on IR of any coach in Browns history, not to mention having some of the worst QBs in Browns history at his disposal.

  • Anonymous

    We can play rank the Browns coaches…

    1. Mangini – Don’t think it is even close…only time we ever had an advantage on the sideline.
    2. Butch – Playoffs get him the edge over Romeo.
    3. Romeo – He did win 10 games and had awesome Donato’s ads.
    4. Shurmur – Thanks Chris Palmer for being here.
    5. Palmer – 5-27

    • Anonymous

      1. P. Brown – HOF – case closed.
      2. B. Collier – 4X Championship game – 5x playoffs – NFL champ
      3. Marty – 3X AFC title games – 4X playoffs
      4. Sam – 2X playoffs
      5. Mangini – had the aircraft carrier on the correct heading.

      • Anonymous

        Well played…where is Bud Carson?

  • Keesh

    LaMonte was a history teacher at my high school in the 80s (Santa Teresa High in San Jose). I remember meeting with him as a sophomore to get him to be the faculty advisor of a club or something else I was starting. I think he also was one of our advisors on the Mock Trial competitions (high school was too long ago…).

    I spent an hour or so with the guy, and he struck me as being really odd and eccentric. He did talk a lot about Stieb (and a little about Holmgren), as that was his only big name client at the time. I really could care less. After our meeting, I remember thinking that I don’t want to spend a whole year with this dude as my junior year US History teacher (and constantly hearing about how great Stieb is), so I took history in the summer at Oak Grove High (irony) so I could take journalism in its place.

    To complete the circle, I used to check out movies (VHS, of course) to Holmgren and his brother at the local video store right next to Oak Grove. I knew who they were only because of LaMonte and the constant Niner polo shirts Holmgren’s brother would always wear. Mike’s brother came in way more often than Mike did.

    Just a little color on my experiences with these guys. I don’t know a whole lot about Holmgren, but I’m super surprised to see the success LaMonte has had. Maybe being an oddball, eccentric agent is the way to do it.

    • Anonymous

      That’s pretty wild. Thanks for sharing. Are you a Browns fan? How’d you find this site?

      • Keesh

        Sorry, I didn’t edit my post very well (tenses), but I think you get the general idea. I’ve always been a die-hard Browns fan. I found your site (but am an infrequent visitor) because I was pissed that the Browns fired Mangini and was looking for like minds.

        I remember my dad watching Browns games on TV when we lived in Cleveland (I was born in Mayfield Heights). I didn’t start following sports until junior high, but since the Niners were everyone’s team in San Jose, I started to follow the Browns. I can still remember those feelings of devastation when Byner fumbled — no sporting moment will ever come close to that. I bet Joe Nedney (yes, the former NFL kicker) and a couple other people because I was so sure the Browns would win.

        Our high school, and Oak Grove, had some pretty good athletes. LaMonte was trying to sign these guys up from high school and represent them. I vaguely remember him saying something like that to me. Jim McMahon went to Andrew Hill, a rival high school, and since this was shortly after the Bears SuperBowl run, LaMonte wanted to get the next McMahon that comes out of Oak Grove or Santa Teresa (we were the two division powerhouses). The two high schools are about a mile apart and each had about 2000 students then.

        I’ll have to see if I can find my yearbook and get a picture of LaMonte from back then.

Previous post:

Next post: