Why is Armond Budish communicating absurd threats on Dan Gilbert’s behalf?

by Cleveland Frowns on March 2, 2017

Last Tuesday afternoon, Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish stood at a packed County Council meeting and emotionally pleaded for Council to approve the most recently proposed $70 million public handout to Dan Gilbert for upgrades to Quicken Loans Arena. Even though there is no legal obligation for the public to provide the proposed subsidy, the County Exec went as far as to say, “we stand a very good chance of losing the Cavaliers and the Q … at the end of the lease if we don’t make this deal now.”

Here, Budish explicitly communicated on Gilbert’s behalf the absurd threat that Gilbert and his surrogates have been hinting at for years to justify the constant flow of nine-figure subsidies to the Cavaliers and Cleveland’s other two professional sports teams (all three, of course, privately-owned): “Give us your money, even though we don’t need it, because if you don’t we’ll pack up our balls and leave town just like Art Modell did.”

Dan's bottomless tin cupThe message here is nothing short of … Click to continue reading at Cleveland Scene

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    Here’s an excellent report by Sam Allard on *this* week’s even worse council meeting on the issue: http://www.clevescene.com/scene-and-heard/archives/2017/03/01/cuyahoga-county-council-exposes-q-deal-as-a-sham-then-shrugs-shoulders

    And some additional detail added by yours truly, with a link to video of some remarkable discourse between Council President Dan Brady and yours truly: https://www.facebook.com/peter.pattakos/posts/10158251766905623

    Excerpt from Allard’s piece:

    “[T]he Cavs and the region’s elected leaders — to say nothing of Cleveland.com — have so thoroughly and effectively conveyed the threat of the franchise’s departure if the county does not submit to the deal that to object on even minor or technical grounds is considered politically toxic.

    “Which is, of course, an inversion of the democratic process. As a reminder: The people that make up a voting public are supposed to determine what’s important to them, and then elected leaders are supposed to work to enact the priorities of their constituents. Elected officials’ job security is supposed to be linked to their success in doing so, or at least to the sincerity of their efforts. But in the current model, a private, corporate entity (composed of negotiators who by and large reside outside of both Cleveland and Cuyahoga County) makes demands, and elected leaders bend over backwards to meet those demands in the face of public outcry. It’s an ugly distortion of democracy and a real disgrace to the region.”

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